Welcome to Multimedia Presentation FoxPro Versus Java as Respectively obsolete Emerging Technologies

The full length video of this presentation can be accessed via:

The menu below contains the five segments of this presentation. This project aimed at investigating the emergence and demise of new technologies using FoxPro and Java as examples. This presentation includes the 5 sections outlined below and detailed in table 1. Each section is illustrated and captured by a related video presentation.
1.  Introduction to Foxpro and Java as respectively Obsolete and Emerging Technology.

2. Definition of Tetrad and application of tetrad on Foxpro and Java as respectively Obsolete and Emerging Technology.

3. Interviews with Decision Maker and End-User on adoption of Foxpro and Java.

4. Identification of the six driving forces of emerging technologies and their impact on Foxpro and Java.

5. The Verdict of History: The fate of FoxPro, the future of Java.

In addition, a comprehensive list of related transcripts with references and a list of the tools and websites used are included in this blog.Actual rubric will be sent to Doctor Thornburg via Email.

Segment Agenda
1 Introducing FoxPro as an Emerging Technology

Introducing FoxPro as Obsolete Technology

Introducing JAVA as an Emerging Technology

 

2 What is a Tetrad?

Tetrad on FoxPro as an Emerging Technology

Tetrad on FoxPro as Obsolete Technology

Tetrad on JAVA as an Emerging Technology

3 Interview with Decision Maker on FoxPro and Java

Interview with Software END USER on FoxPro and Java

4 The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies

FoxPro Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.

Java Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies

 

5 The Verdict: Fate of FoxPro and Java

The Future, Where is java heading to?

Summary AND References

Why Java is the Future?

===========================================

The JAVA VALUE PROPOSITION

Table 1

Transcript:

  1. Segment 1 Transcript

 

Slide 1

 

Greetings:

My name is Joseph K. Vermeille and I am very pleased to welcome you to my Multimedia Presentation on FoxPro Versus Java as respectively Obsolete and Emerging Technologies.

 

This presentation was conceived, engineered, created, and deployed by your presenter, Joseph K. Vermeille, in partial fulfillment of course EDUC 8342, Emerging and Future Technologies, under the professorship of Doctor David Thornburg at Walden University.

 

Slide 2:

 

This is the agenda for this presentation. I will be introducing and defining:

The FoxPro Programming Language

The Java Programming Language.

Tetrad

I will illustrate the definition of tetrad with actual tetrads on

FoxPro as an Emerging Technology

FoxPro as an Obsolete Technology

JAVA as an Emerging Technology

Furthermore, this presentation will conduct Interview with

Application Systems Director James Malcafour on his experience with FoxPro and Java Software END USER Maria DelaRosa on her experience with FoxPro and Java. Following these interviews will be Analysis of FoxPro and Java in the context of the six driving forces of emerging technologies. That segment will have

Definition of the six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.

FoxPro Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.

Java Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.

 

The presentation will conclude with:

The Verdict, Fate of FoxPro and Java

The Future, Where is java heading to?

Summary.

References.

 

Slide 3

What is FoxPro?

According to WIKIPEDIA, “FoxPro is a text-based procedurally oriented programming language and DBMS, and it is also an object-oriented software programming, originally published by Fox Software and later by Microsoft, for MS-DOS, Windows, Macintosh, and UNIX. The final published release of FoxPro was 2.6. Development continued under the Visual FoxPro label, which in turn was discontinued in 2007” (Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FoxPro ).

I can deduct three distinct FoxPro moments from this definition.

  1. The first one starts with its origins as a product of Fox Software.
  2. The second one stems from the last version of the software at 2.6 under the name FoxPro.
  3. The last one started with the Visual FoxPro label which ended in 2007 with the planned, programmed death of the software with version 2.9.

On the left hand of this slide is a FoxPro Word Cloud partly generated by the text on the right. The Key terms which contribute to define FoxPro from the text are:

Programming

Microsoft Software

MS DOS

UNIX

Macintosh

Discontinued

Etc.

 

Briefly:

FoxPro: text-based procedurally oriented programming language

DBMS = Database Management System

Object-Oriented Software Programming Language

The software was originally published by Fox Software and later by Microsoft, for MS-DOS, Windows, Macintosh, and UNIX.

The final published release of FoxPro was 2.6 after which it was renamed VISUAL FOXPRO

Development continued under the Visual FoxPro label, until version 9.0, at which it was discontinued in 2007

 

For a complete timeline of the life cycle of Foxpro, please go to

http://www.foxprohistory.org/foxprotimeline.htm

 

 

Slide 4

 

What is Java?

WIKIPEDIA defined Java as A general-purpose computer programming language that is concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, and specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible.

 

Java is intended to let application developers “write once, run anywhere” (WORA), meaning that code that runs on one platform does not need to be recompiled to run on another. In other words, once an application has been written, it is ready to run on MAC, WINDOWS, LINUX, and elsewhere.

Java is, as of 2014, one of the most popular programming languages in use, particularly for client-server web applications, with a reported 9 million

Developers.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language) )

On the left hand of this slide is a Word Cloud partly generated by the text on the right. According to Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

 

“A word cloud is a graphical representation of word frequency. It basically features the prominent words that are so often cited in a piece of text” (retrieved from http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/best-10-free-word-cloud-tools-for.html )

 

From a Word Cloud, one can quickly grasp the theme or context of a text

 

The Key terms which contribute to define JAVA here are:

Programming

SUN MICROSYSTEMS

Developers

Oracle

Byte code

Application

Web Languages

Virtual Architecture

Etc.

 

 

Slide 5:

According to John K. Waters’ Blog located at http://adtmag.com/blogs/watersworks/2014/12/java-caching.aspx, Miko Matsumura served as Chief Java Evangelist at Sun Microsystems in the late 90s. This picture is his rendition of the evolution of Java.

During an interview posted on John Waters’ blog on December 3rd, 2014 Miko Matsumura reportedly said:

“When people think about the Java Virtual Machine, they tend to think about a single machine. Back in the olden days of Java, it was like, it’s a Windows machine or it’s a Mac or it’s a Linux box. There was this mindset that the ‘machine’ was this monolithic, single operating system. But over time, that construct has become much more of a programmatic abstraction. When people deploy Java applications, it’s only a machine in a conceptual sense. Developers think of the Java machine as a machine just because that allows them not to break their heads.”

This graph captures the evolution of JAVA from a somewhat Darwinist perspective to become the robust system it is today”.

 

 

 

  1. Segment 2 Transcript

 

Slide 2

 

In Laureate Education (2014f),  Doctor David Thornburg reported that the tetrad was developed by McLuhan as part of his Laws of Media. Doctor Thornburg defined the TETRAD followed:

“A graphic that has four quadrants to it. And the reason for the four quadrants is his assertion that every medium does four things and does them simultaneously. The first quadrant addresses what it is that this technology does that’s new. What does it enhance? What does it make it possible that we weren’t able to do before? Second quadrant, what does it obsolete? Third quadrant, what does this new technology does that rekindles something or retrieves something from the past, sometimes distant past? And fourth, it sets the stage for its own reversal or demise sometime in the future”.

 

In the tetrad, the top left quadrant references Enhancement, Innovation; the top right quadrant refers to obsolescence; the lower left quadrant will hold what has been rekindled, and lower right quadrant relate to the self-reversal of the innovation.

 

Slide 3:

 

I am here presenting a TETRAD ON FOXPRO AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, WHEN THE SOFTWARE WAS EMERGING BETWEEN 1989 AND 199 ACCORDING TO http://www.foxprohistory.org/foxprotimeline.htm

As can be seen of the first Quadrant, FOXPRO ENHANCED

  1. Multiplatform Development (DOS,

WINDOWS, UNIX, MAC-OS)

  1. Client Server Programming
  2. Self-Contained RDBMS. Extension

Of affordable RDBMS to small

Businesses

  1. Became a Menace to Microsoft Access, .NET

(Prior to FoxPro acquisition by

Microsoft)

  1. Mew generation of developers

On the Second quadrant we can see that

FOXPRO Obsoleted:

  1. Dbase
  2. FoxBASE
  3. Clipper
  4. Filepro
  5. Single Platform development tools

On the Quadrant we observe that FOXPRO Rekindled

  1. DBase II, dBase III, dBase IV, FoxBASE
  2. Platform Specific Software Development (DOS, UNIX, MAC)

On the Fourth and last Quadrant, we see that FOXPRO, AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, and Reversed:

  1. Limitations of RDBMS tools combining DATA and Solid Programming functionalities.
  2. Limitation for Cross Platform RDBMS tool from a single IDE.
  3. The myth of Microsoft supremacy in RDBMS market.

 

 

I am here presenting a TETRAD ON FOXPRO AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, WHEN THE SOFTWARE WAS EMERGING BETWEEN 1989 AND 199 ACCORDING TO http://www.foxprohistory.org/foxprotimeline.htm

As can be seen of the first Quadrant, FOXPRO ENHANCED

  1. Multiplatform Development (DOS,

WINDOWS, UNIX, MAC-OS)

  1. Client Server Programming
  2. Self-Contained RDBMS. Extension

Of affordable RDBMS to small

Businesses

  1. Became a Menace to Microsoft Access, .NET

(Prior to FoxPro acquisition by

Microsoft)

  1. Mew generation of developers

On the Second quadrant we can see that

FOXPRO Obsoleted:

  1. Dbase
  2. FoxBASE
  3. Clipper
  4. Filepro
  5. Single Platform development tools

On the Quadrant we observe that FOXPRO Rekindled

  1. DBase II, dBase III, dBase IV, FoxBASE
  2. Platform Specific Software Development (DOS, UNIX, MAC)

On the Fourth and last Quadrant, we see that FOXPRO, AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, and Reversed:

  1. Limitations of RDBMS tools combining DATA and Solid Programming functionalities.
  2. Limitation for Cross Platform RDBMS tool from a single IDE.
  3. The myth of Microsoft supremacy in RDBMS market.

 

 

Slide 4

When in 2007 Microsoft decided to stop THE PROGRESSION OF FOXPRO BEYOND VERSION 9.0, it was a death sentence,

I call it OBSOLENCE BY DESIGN, THE PRODUCT, REGARDLESS OF its STRENGTH and robustness, BECAME AUTOMATICALLY OBSOLETE. THIS NEW REALITY THEREFORE WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR THIS NEW TETRAD ON FOXPRO AS AN OBSOLETE TECHNOLOGY:

Per Quadrant 1, the demise of FOXPRO Enhances:

Reality of Software life cycle

  1. The need to consider alternatives
  2. Evidence of Microsoft Arrogance and Supremacy
  3. The necessity to keep Data (Backend) and Client (front-end) independent
  4. Another reason to go Open Source
  5. FoxPro as Open Source
  6. Quest for alternatives to FOXPRO

 

Per Quadrant 2, the demise of FOXPRO Obsoletes

  1. Availability of Data Base Development Tool for quick self-contained                       Database development
  2. Blind trust in Microsoft
  3. FoxPro Programming skills set
  4. Affordable RDBMS for small businesses

 Per Quadrant 3, the demise of FOXPRO Rekindles

  1. Software life cycle
  2. Client and Data Independence as best practice
  3. VB, SQL Server, .NET,
  4. Mistrust of Microsoft on FoxPro Acquisition to protect its turf .NET, ACCESS
  5. History: Word vs WordPerfect
  6. History: Netscape vs Internet Explorer

 

 

Per Quadrant 4, the demise of FOXPRO Reverses

  1. Fear and Confusion
  2. Do nothing alternative
  3. Conversion from FoxPro
  4. Migration to other tools, Data extraction, and other tools
  5. Emergence of Java and other Open Source Cross Platform tools for Cloud, Mobile, and SaaS Computing.

 

Slide 6

In LUKE 9 VERSE 60, JESUS SAID: “Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God.“

FOXPRO IS DEAD, WE CAN SAY THANKS YOU LORD JAVA! FoxPro Programmers and Business Owners should now migrate to JAVA and endorse this new Gospel!

Well, THIS IS A Tetrad on JAVA as an Emerging Technology

In Quadrant 1, we find that JAVA Enhances

  1. Write Once, Run Anywhere“ (WORA)
  2. Platform-independence. Multiple configurations for different types of platform
  3. Free and open source software, (FOSS)
  4. Running applications “on everything from laptops to data centers, game consoles to scientific supercomputers”.
  5. Mobile communications. 3 billion mobile phones run Java
  6. Just-in-time compilation

 

QUADRANT 2 REVEALS THAT JAVA as an Emerging Technology Obsoletes:

Standalone Applications Development

  1. Procedural Programming
  2. Perl,
  3. COBOL
  4. C, C++

 Quadrant 3 shows that JAVA as an Emerging Technology Rekindles:

  1. Pascal
  2. C,
  3. C++
  4. COBOL
  5. OOP
  6. Multiplatform Programming

 

 

 And Quadrant 4 reveals that JAVA as an Emerging Technology Reverses:

  1. DART
  2. HTLM5
  3. Android
  4. Java 9

 

  1. Segment 3 Transcript

 

  1. Transcript of interviews with Decision Maker

Mr. Malcafour, Can you provide some information about your background as an Information Technology Professional?

I would like first to thank you for your interests in my views as a contribution to your research. I want to wish you the best in your academic and professional endeavors.

Well, telling you about my y background as an IT (Information Technology Professional will take us back to a quarter of century ago when I started working as a staff accountant and later on as a business analyst with another institution. I must emphasize that in College, I was a majoring in Accounting with a minor in MIS (Management Information Systems). Most of my technology training came from “on the job training” or “job related professional development”. I did however have the basics from College. Those basic skills included word-processing, spreadsheet, Databases, and COBOL Programming. 25 years ago, that was 1989, and my job was to collect, capture, and document the actual user experience. I was like an intermediary between the users and developers, and later become a Programmer with assignments using COBOL, dBase, and FoxBASE which later on became respectively FoxPro and Visual FoxPro. From there I became Programmer until I became Director of Application Systems Development which has been my current position for the last five years.

  1. Obviously you have been a witness of the Emergence of FoxPro as a new Technology. What is your recollection of the early years of FoxPro Adoption?

My first recollection goes back to the similarities of FoxPro with Dbase and FoxBASE environments from which it derived. The language was practically the same and they share the same data file structures with the extension DBF. I remember that FoxPro 1.0 was released in 1989, and the product was acquired by Microsoft in 1992 The first most powerful version of FoxPro was 2.6 which came out in 1993 and to date we are still using that version to accomplish certain tasks.

(Innovation)

  1. You are still using FoxPro 2.6 which is now 21 years old?

Yes, we are but I need to situate this reality within the evolutionary context of the life cycle of the software.

  1. Interesting. Can you situate that context within the context of how, when, and why you did you come to the decision to adopt FoxPro as a development tool in your organization?

Need was the first criterion for me to recommend FoxPro as a software development tool in my organization. We needed a tool that was reliable, robust, affordable, and flexible enough for the conception, development, and implementation of our business processes. We needed to develop our own tool to serve multiplatform users which included MAC, UNIX, DOS, AND Windows users in a client server environment.. In addition we needed a tool with a comprehensibly short learning curve for the experienced team of programmers I was managing. The year was 1995 and FoxPro 2.6, as a new Microsoft product, was the immediate answer to our needs.

A few years later, after the release of subsequent releases of Visual FoxPro between 1995 and 1997, I decided to migrate the application from FoxPro 2.6 to Visual FoxPro in order to meet certain technical requirements. Nevertheless, to fasten the migration process, we needed to avoid having to redesign every screen in order to meet the requirements of the Visual FoxPro environment. This is the context which keeps us using FoxPro 2.6 to this date, 21 years after its original release. The Screen Writer from FoxPro 2.6 enables programmers to generate actual programs from visually generated screens.

  1. What version of Visual FoxPro did you migrate to?

That was version 6.0 and it was our last FoxPro upgrade.

  1. So your staff never had a chance to use 9.0, the last FoxPro version.

No, FoxPro is dead, it makes no sense risking using dying software

  1. Indeed, In March 2007, Microsoft announced that there will be no VFP 10,[8] thus making VFP9 (released to manufacturing on December 17, 2004) the last commercial VFP release from Microsoft. Microsoft also announced that support for FoxPro will end in January 2015 (Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_FoxPro ). What do you think of this decision?

I believe that the decision to retire FoxPro is a strategic one on the part of Microsoft Corporation. May be they are trying to silence FoxPro in order to push new similar or existing other products. Regardless, that decision is unfair to the millions of customers out there, developers, business owners, and end-users who have invested their time and resources in FoxPro.

  1. What was the impact of Microsoft Corporation decision’s to retire FoxPro on your organization?

Once we became aware of the decision to retire FoxPro, my team and I decided the following:

  1. No more upgrade to other version of FoxPro.
  2. We needed to find alternatives.
  3. We had to make a compelling case to the executive branch for support and funds to migrate our FoxPro proprietary software to more stable environments.
  4. And what was the outcome?

There were two outcomes which led to the migration of our FoxPro resources to two different environments, an Oracle ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) System and online modular proprietary software tools developed in Java by my team of programmers. I do not want to go into specifics but I must emphasize that while the ERP System could accommodate much functionality, certain processes had to me developed in house, and Java was the best alternative to FoxPro in this regard.

  1. Why did Java emerge as a replacement to FoxPro?

Many factors explain the emergence of Java as an alternative to FoxPro.

  1. Java is the number one Programming Language for Enterprise Development and web application.
  2. Java is flexible enough multiplatform development.
  3. There are millions of competent Java Developers available.
  4. Java meets the requirements of the present and the next version, Java 9, is being written to meet the future face to face.
  5. Last but not least, Java is Open Source, and its current owner, Oracle Corporation cannot do to Java what Microsoft did to FoxPro.
  6. Was Java the only alternative to FoxPro?

No, Java was the best alternative for me but there are many other products out there which can replace FoxPro. I can for instance name Lianja (Retrieved from http://www.lianja.com ) and Servoy (Retrieved from http://servoy.com).

  1. Is your organization looking beyond Java?

We are currently contemplating the universe of cloud computing and I am glad Java is compatible with the clouds. Oracle is currently offering Java Cloud Services. We are not currently looking beyond Java but you never know when the next technological innovation in this field will emerge. That is why are keeping an open mind and an open heart by keeping our data as independent as possible from the client.

  1. What is the overall strategy for technology adoption by your organization? Does your institution adopt new technologies as soon as they are released or do you have a wait and see attitude?

Here, our overall strategy responds to three fundamental concepts

  1. Reliability which mandates that we are consistent in providing our services.
  2. Recoverability which requires that we are fit to quickly recover from disaster.
  3. And Adaptability which defines are capabilities to face changing technological and business climates, including technological innovations today and tomorrow.

In other words, in order to us to cope with this agenda, we stand between the early and late majority of adopters. This balance is critical for us in the fulfillment of our mission.

  1. This was my last question. I truly thank you for the interview. As promised, I will gladly send to you a copy of the finished product.
  1. Transcript of interviews with Software End User:

I must thank you, Ms. Maria Delarosa, for accepting to give me this interview. Can you provide some information about your background as a software user in general?

My experience as software end-user actually started while I was in college during the mid-1990s with the release of Windows 1995 which created something like a revolution in the software industry. Many people for the first time found themselves obligated to upgrade their computers in order to be able to use the new operating system which was very demanding in terms of memory and disk space. I had to have the family computer upgraded with a new hard drive and additional memory. My real experience started with the task of reinstalling Microsoft Office at home and skill which paved the way for me to develop future interests as a competent and experienced end-user.

For how long have you been at your current position as Budget Director?

I started working here in 2000 as a Staff Accountant and was promoted to the positions of Assistant Director and Budget Director respectively in 2008 and 2010. But since I started in 2000, I have been playing a major role as an end-user with the Financial Systems. I was there when the system was migrated from FoxPro 2.6 to Visual FoxPro and later on from Visual FoxPro to Java.

Can you describe your role with respect to the financial application modules developed in FoxPro?

I can say that the FoxPro and Visual FoxPro versions of the Financial Systems were Client-Server Applications which ran under the DOS, WINDOWS, UNIX, and MAC Operating Systems. From my ability to detect and report bugs, to my suggestions on the needs for enhancements, improved performance, and better quality reporting on the budget module, I was progressively acknowledged as a key end user until I became Budget Director.

Did you know FoxPro?

I did learn the user functionalities of the software and the basics of the language. FoxPro was shipped with user manuals and developers documentation. Such efforts greatly help in my communication and interaction with developers.

How did you react to the news of the end-of-life of FoxPro?

I had mixed feelings about it. First, I felt betrayed due to the efforts I had made in learning the software. When that news came in 2007, I was investigating the features of FoxPro 9.0, especially the functionalities on Application Development for the Web. Nevertheless, I embraced the news of the demise of FoxPro as a wonderful opportunity to learn new tools and to have the entire budget module redesigned from scratch.

And the new tool was Java. Can you describe your role with respect to the financial applications developed in Java?

I worked closely with the programmer in charge of the module and we have today a budget module witch meets all of our needs as an institution. We started from scratch with pen and paper by identifying functionalities and reports that were to stay as they were, those that needed to be changed and the scope of the desired modifications, and new features and reports that did not exist. We held meetings every Fridays to check on progress being made and revise requirements. Serving as a liaison between Applications Development Team and the user’s community, I am happy to report now we have a budget tool which meets all of our objectives without the need for cross platform and connectivity patches as was the case with FoxPro.

What differences can you establish between the FoxPro and Java versions of the financial applications?

With the FoxPro version, we had a client server application which was built over time. In that case, the application was using files downloaded on the local computer to connect to the main server. Changes for one operating system had to be customized for every other one. In the Java version, we have a web based application which runs on web browsers, anywhere, anytime, irrespective of the nature of the operating system. In addition, changes in the code stay the same for all operating systems.

Thank you very much for your contribution.

  1. Segment 4 Transcript

 

Slide 1

Hi, my name is Jennifer Digital. I will be conducting this section of this Multimedia Presentation on the SIX FORCES THAT DRIVE EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES.

How can we explain the circumstances that led to the emergence and obsolescence of FoxPro and the emergence of Java?

This question leads to consideration of the six forces that Doctor David Thornburg (Laureate Education, 2014j) identified as drivers of emerging technologies. This section of the presentation will introduce and define those six forces and apply them to analyze the evolution of FoxPro and Java and the demise of Java.

The forces identified by Doctor Thornburg are:

First:     Evolutionary Technologies on the top left corner of the screen.

Second: Rhymes of History represented by the flag on the middle left side of the screen.

Third:   Disruptive Technologies represented by the light bulb on the bottom left side of the screen.

Fourth: Science Fiction, represented by the camera on the top right corner of the screen.

Fifth:     Increasing Returns, represented by the icon on the middle right corner of the screen.

Sixth and last: Red Queens, represented by the star at the bottom right corner of the screen.

 

Slide 2:

This slide is introducing the Evolutionary, the Rhymes of History, and the Disruptive Forces

First:     Evolutionary Technologies on the top left corner of the screen.

EVOLUTION is the key term. Evolutionary Technologies develop overtime. Doctor Thornburg sees them as PROGRESSION, GROWTH from previous technologies.

Second: Rhymes of History represented by the flag on the middle left side of the screen.

The Rhymes of History Force links the root of a new Technology to some distant past. In some ways, one can perceive in EMAILS the essence of the mission of the PIGEON MESSENGERS.

Third:   Disruptive Technologies represented by the light bulb on the bottom left side of the screen.

Disruptive Technologies refer to those sudden, unexpected new MODUS OPERANDI that invade the socio-cultural milieu to change everything. ATM, DNA, and Cellular Technologies are great examples. ATM, DNA, and Cellular Technologies are great examples OF Disruptive Technologies.

 

Slide 3:

This slide is introducing the Evolutionary, the Rhymes of History, and the Disruptive Forces

First:     Evolutionary Technologies on the top left corner of the screen.

EVOLUTION is the key term. Evolutionary Technologies develop overtime. Doctor Thornburg see them as PROGRESSION, GROWTH from previous technologies.

Second: Rhymes of History represented by the flag on the middle left side of the screen.

The Rhymes of History Force links the root of a new Technology to some distant past. In some ways, one can perceive in EMAILS the essence of the mission of the PIGEON MESSENGERS.

Third:   Disruptive Technologies represented by the light bulb on the bottom left side of the screen.

Disruptive Technologies refer to those sudden, unexpected new MODUS OPERANDI that invade the socio-cultural milieu to change everything. ATM, DNA, and Cellular Technologies are great examples. ATM, DNA, and Cellular Technologies are great examples OF Disruptive Technologies.

Slide 4:

Did FOXPRO EMERGE AS A RESULT OF SCIENCE FICTION?

NO: FoxPro does not have a Science Fiction Root.

Was the EMERGENCE OF FOXPRO THE RESULT OF INCREASING RETURNS?

YES: FoxPro rendered OBSOLETE Dbase, FoxBASE, Clipper, Filepro to become king in the PC based Database market.

Did FoxPro benefit from the Red Queen Phenomenon?

NO: FoxPro never had a Competitor running neck to neck for supremacy.

Slide 5:

Did JAVA emerge FROM THE EVOLUTIONARY FORCE?

YES, like FoxPro, Java emerged as an Evolutionary Technology from Pascal, C, C++, Perl, Procedural Programming, Object Oriented Programming, and Standalone Applications.

Is the emergence of Java related to the Rhymes of HISTORY?

YES, like FoxPro, the English-like language and syntax of JAVA are reminiscent of the characteristics of earlier Programming Languages such as Fortran, Pascal, C, C++, Perl, Pascal, C, C++, Perl.

Is Java a DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY?

YES, has been a Disruptive Technology in the Programming Language industry due to its adaptability and compatibility with other disruptive technologies or paradigms such as Cloud Computing, Software as a Service (SaaS), and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD).

 

Slide 6:

Does Java have its roots to Science Fiction?

  1. The emergence of JAVA is in no way linked to Science Fiction. It is however been used widely to develop science fiction games and robots.

Is the success of Java the outcome of Increasing Returns?

YES, Java as shadowed previously existing and newly developed Programming Languages to become the TOP one, “The Chosen One”, as a result of the Increasing Returns Force.

Is the success of Java the outcome of the RED QUEENS COMPETITION?

NO – At least NOT YET- The Red Queen situation calls for two competitive products running neck and neck. Currently, JAVA is the lone star ahead. God knows for how long with threats from DART and ANDROID by Google, HTML5 from the Open Source Community.

  1. Segment 6 Transcript

 

Slide 1:

 

FOXPRO IS DOWN

JAVA IS UP!

Should we Mourn

Or Celebrate!

I am not sure!

 

Slide 2:

My Eulogy of FoxPro!

  1. FOXPRO, The victim, was not sick.

I knew him. He has been my bread winner since the early 1990’s.

My first real job as a Programmer was through him, 1992, at Watts 800 Inc., in Evansville, Indiana.

For T A D Exterminating Inc.., in Greenlawn, New York, in 1995, I designed CEMIS, USING FOXPRO 2.6.

To this date, January 9th, 2015, CEMIS is running fine, TO THE FULL SATISFACTION OF ITS OWNER.

In 1997, thanks to FoxPro, I landed the best job I have been blessed with to this day.

Latter today, January 9th, 2015, I must deploy some new enhancements at the same job using FOXPRO.

Even after his death,

Even in New York where IT IS SOMETIMES HARD TO BREATHE.

FOXPRO IS THE LIFELINE OF SO MANY ORGANIZATIONS.

The guy was in plain form,

Ready for easy and affordable development for the WEB, Software as a Service, Telephony applications, and mobile devices.

They killed him.

FoxPro died a Death By Design.

The Death came from its own Maker.

It was Filicide.

The act of killing one’s own child.

Filicide, YES Filicide, FOXPRO DIED BY Filicide!

But Planned Obsolescence is a business practice, an art, A CORE COMPETENCY mastered by Microsoft since DOS 1.0.

Some will call it Corporate Greed!

Now you know why every year

We have a new version of Microsoft Office!        

A New Version of Microsoft Everything!

REST IN PEACE FOXPRO! According to McLuhan’s Laws of Media, I know you will come back some day, to REKINDLE THE PAST!

IN THE MEANTIME,

WITH NOSTALGIA,

I AM SAYING, THANK YOU!

REST IN PEACE FOXPRO!

 

 

This is the agenda for this presentation.

  1. Introducing FoxPro.
  2. Introducing Java.
  3. What is a Tetrad?
  4. Tetrads on FoxPro as an Emerging Technology.
  5. Tetrads on FoxPro as an Obsolete Technology.
  6. Tetrads on JAVA as an Emerging Technology.
  7. Interview with Software Director on FoxPro and Java.
  8. Interview with Software USER on FoxPro and Java.
  9. The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.
  10. FoxPro Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.
  11. Java Versus The six Driving Forces of Emerging Technologies.
  12. The Future, Where is java heading to?
  13. Summary.
  14. References.

References

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014a). David Thornburg: Disruptive technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014d). David Thornburg: Evolutionary technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014e). David Thornburg: Increasing returns [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014f). David Thornburg: McLuhan’s Tetrad [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014g). David Thornburg: Red queens [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014h). David Thornburg: Rhymes of history [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014i). David Thornburg: Science fiction [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014j). David Thornburg: Six forces that drive emerging technologies[Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed.). New York, NY: Free Press.

List of technologies and websites used:

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